The Epic Rulebook Version 2.0

Well now that Set 1 is about to enter play testing, ive gone over and edited the rules, incorporating previous updates. while This is not the final version of the rule book this is the most up to date version and very few elements should change before the project’s completion so for those of you who own a printer or enjoy PDF format: Standard Rule Book

in addition to make game play easier, here is a companion documents with the abilities for reference during the game: Abilities Guide.

For those who like reading online, here are the complete set of rules and instructions for EPIC:

Epic – Rulebook

Introduction:

Object of the Game

Epic is a strategy game played typically played by two players, each of whom has a customized deck of Epic cards. Over the course of the game, each player will take turns playing cards such as footholds (which enable you to play your other cards), characters, incidents, and items. Each player starts with predefined number of character points. You earn these points by eliminating your opponent’s characters from battle. The first player to reach an agreed upon amount points wins.

In Epic, you play the role a Beyonder (an omnipotent being from a realm outside of the multitude of multiverses). Your deck of cards contains objects, events and characters from the multiverses that you can use to eliminate your opponent’s characters and win the game.

Section 1: The Basics

For a Beyonder to reach into a universe and deploy it’s multitude of characters and histories, they must fist open a door into this realm; we call this door a foothold. There are various types of footholds that can be used to pay the energy costs of your actions. Each foothold provides you with a certain kind of energy, cards from different realms and with different origins require different types of energy to enter play. Depending of the type of game you are playing you may choose to utilize different types of energies which give you access to different characters or focus on a single type of energy.

For example, Wolverine has a red energy cost, and tapping (turning) a Marvel Universe™ foothold gives you red energy that you can spend to bring Stan Lee into play. Wolverine also has a Genetics symbol attached to its energy cost which means you may also use a Genetics Origin Foothold to bring Stan Lee into play.

Multiverse Footholds

In a multiverse game of Epic, a card is drawn from its native Multiverse onto the battle field. To pay the energy costs you must establish a foothold in the native universe. There are three Multiverses represented by different colors in which you can gain a foothold and draw cards forth.

Blue

Blue energy flows from the massive DC™ and WildStorm™ Multiverse. This energy can be used to pay the energy costs of legendary Heroes and Villains like Superman™, and The Joker™, to fringe characters like Grifter™ and Apollo™.

Red

Red energy comes from the Marvel™ Multiverse and can be used to pay the energy requirements of marvel heroes and villains such as Spider-man™, Loki™, and the Hulk™.

Black

Black energy comes from the outer rim of independent comics and can fuel characters from Image™, Dynamite™, Dark Horse and others. Such characters include Lady Death™, Invincible™ and The Green Hornet™.

Origin Footholds

In an origins game of Epic, a character can be drawn from its native Multiverse onto the battle field using energy obtained from a foothold over a specific type of origin energy. There are six types of origin energies represented by different symbols in which you can gain a foothold and draw characters forth.

Magical

Magical energy originates in dimensions outside of the natural world. Some characters are born into naturally occurring magical abilities while others learn or gain their magical abilities later in life. Characters with magical origins include Dr. Strange™, Spawn™, and Zatanna™

Genetic

Genetic energy comes from the DNA of characters. Some characters belong to species that evolve independently from humans here on earth while others are born from humans but discover a mutation in their genetic code giving them abilities outside of the norm. Characters with genetic origins include Aquaman™, Harada™, and Wolverine™.

Technological

Technological energy stems through the development of technology. Characters may be robotic in origin, wear a suit of armor or have cybernetic implants. Examples of these characters include Bloodshot™, Iron-man™ and Red Tornado™.

Alien

Alien energy flows from extra terrestrial worlds. These characters may be aliens, the offspring of aliens and humans or wield an Alien weapon of some kind. Some alien characters include X-O Manowar™, Voodoo™, and the Silver Surfer™.

Transformative

Transformative energy empowers the accidental heroes and villains of the mutiverses. It comes from science, chaos and chance resulting in an altered human. Examples of altered humans include The Flash™, Spider-man™ and The Traveler™

Conditional

Conditional energy resides in the hearts and minds of characters; it is what drives them to do good or evil. While some characters are cursed or blessed with other forms of energy some characters have nothing special about them. These characters rely on skill, intelligence and extraordinary background events. Conditional characters include, The Punisher™, Bat-man™ and Kick-Ass™.

Multiple Origins:

Not all characters have a single origin. Over the years some characters have evolved and changed while others have always walked a grey line between worlds; these characters draw their abilities from multiple origins and a Beyonder may use an alternate energy form  to draw that character forth. For example Angela™ is an character best know as an ally/nemesis of Spawn™  an Image™ character, however recently the character has been drawn into the pages of Marvel™ comics. As a result of this Paradigm shift, Angela may be brought into play with either Black Footholds or any combination of Red and Black Footholds.

The Wildstorm Paradigm: At the time of Epic’s inception the Wildstorm™ universe was completely merged with the DC™ universe, as a result all Wildstorm characters may be brought into play with either Blue Footholds or any combination of Blue and Black Footholds.

The Vertigo Paradigm: The Vertigo™ universe has never completely merged with the DC™ universe but as time continues more and more of the barriers between the worlds fade as a result all Vertigo characters may be brought into play with either Black Footholds or any combination of Blue and Black Footholds.

Parts of a Card

Energy Cost

Energy is the main resource in the game. It’s produced by footholds, and you spend it bring cards into play. The symbols in a card’s lower right corner tell you the cost of that card. If the energy cost reads [7 blue energy], you pay seven energy by tapping a DC™ foothold (blue energy) to bring it into play.

Origin Symbol(s)

This symbol indicates where a card’s abilities originate from (in origin games it is also an alternate method to pay for this card’s energy costs).

Card Type

While there are many unique and defining features to any given card type, this symbol helps you quickly identify your characters from your footholds, items and incident cards.

Defense/Combat Value

Each character card has two spots at the top of the card for combat and defense values. A character’s combat strength (the first number) is how much damage it deals in combat. Its defense (the second number) is how much damage it must receive to injure it.

Text Box

This is where a card’s special abilities appear. These special abilities can be a unique ability for a character or an alternate form of attack. This space will be where the effects of incident and item cards will be listed.

Labels

This box lists any common abilities a character may have. Most common abilities are listed in this book. A common ability on a character’s card will only include a keyword not an explanation of what it does. Special abilities will be listed in the text box.

Character Type

This is a character’s species, race or subgroup. This is usually a special way of distinguishing this character and including them amongst a larger group. Character types are written in white just below the image. Some common types include, Human, Mutant, Cyborg and God.

Card Image/Publisher/Card Name

Each card in Epic will have an Image and a Name to differentiate it from other cards, the publisher shows which universe a character or item originates from, while some incidents are based on the events of various character stories they do not bare a publisher.

Card Types

There are four types of Epic card. A card’s type tells you when you can play the card and what happens to the card after you do.

Incident

An incident represents an event, or the action of characters outside of play. You can use an incident at just about any time during a game even during your opponent’s turn. Each incident card will tell you exactly when it can be played; this is called its activation.  An incident also has an effect (what it does), a target (which cards it affects), and a duration (how long the effects last) described in its text box.

Item

An item represents an artifact, weapon, or a device. While each will have a different effect most will be played on an individual character and remain in play until the end of the game unless the character it is played on is removed from play or the item is destroyed.

Character

Characters are the central cards in Epic. You use characters to attack your opponent’s characters and absorb attacks from them. Each character has a combat value and defense value; its combat value (the first number) is how much damage it deals in combat. Its defense value (the second number) is how much damage must be dealt to it in a single turn to injure it. Characters may also use their powers to attack (and in some cases defend). Characters typically attack and use their abilities during the Pre-Combat phase unless a character’s card specifies an exception.

Each character has four possible states: healthy, injured, disabled and dead; healthy and injured characters are considered active while disabled and dead characters are considered inactive. A player obtains points equal to a character’s energy cost by rendering it inactive. Only an active character is able to attack or use abilities and powers, labels still apply to inactive characters, for example Rogue™ does not stop being a mutant when she is dead.

Footholds

Unlike most other cards a foothold does not have an energy cost, establishing a foothold in a universe is an innate ability of a Beyonder. To play a foothold, just put it onto the playing surface. You can play a foothold during your Pre-Combat phase. You can’t play more than one foothold per turn. Footholds give you the ability to make energy; you use this energy to pay for characters, items and incidents.

Each foothold taps into the energy of a multiverse or an Origin. Marvel™ multiverse footholds generate red energy, Dc™ and Wildstorm™ multiverse footholds generate blue energy and independent footholds like Image™ and Dark Horse™ generate black energy.

The Playing Field

Here’s what a table setup looks like. Because there is no game board, imaginary lines divide areas of play on your table.

Hand

When you draw cards, they go to your hand, just as in most other card games. No one except you can look at the cards in your hand. You start the game with seven cards in your hand, and you have a maximum hand size of seven. (You may have more than seven cards in your hand, but you must discard down to seven at the end of each of your turns.) Each player has his or her own hand.

Battlefield

You start the game with nothing on the battlefield, but this is where the action is going to be. On each of your turns, you can play a foothold from your hand. Characters, items, and incidents also enter the battlefield after they are played. You can arrange your battlefield however you want, but your opponent must be able to see all of them and tell whether they’re tapped. Traditionally footholds will line up in front of you from left to right, characters in a row or two in front of footholds with a zone in the upper right corner reserved for Incidents and items that act independently of characters.

Discards

The discard pile is a stack of cards whose effects have ended. Your cards go to your discard pile if an effect causes them to be discarded; or if they have been played and have reached the end of the duration in which they were active. Items that have been destroyed will also be placed in the discard pile. The discard pile is face down and unless a card specifies otherwise neither you nor your opponent may look through the discard pile.

Graveyard

Your graveyard is your discard pile for characters. Unless a card states otherwise all characters go to the graveyard when they are killed, or suffer the effects of a card that discards or removes them from play. Your characters go to your graveyard if they receive three wounds. A character becomes wounded if it receives damage equal or greater than its defensive value. A character is normally put into the graveyard face up.

Holding Area

The holding area is where characters are placed in reserve. This allows a Beyonder to save a character from being killed and gives the opponent a chance to earn that character’s points for a second time. A character is normally moved to the holding area after being wounded. A player may move any character under their control and in play into the holding area as long as they pay half of their energy costs rounded up to transport them there. A character transports any items and incidents attached to it for free; these are only removed if the character dies. The holding area has a capacity of 30 points and should not be exceeded in a standard game. A player can recruit any or all of the characters in the holding area into play for free during their recruit and evacuate phase.

Resources

Your deck of cards is known as your resources. During a game you draw cards from your resources to use in the game. Your resources are your only source of cards once a game has begun and you may not add or remove cards while a game is in progress.

Section 2: Mechanics

This section describes the actions that you’ll take during a game. You’ll learn how to get the energy you need to pay for characters, items and incidents and how each of these cards work.

Producing Energy

To play any card you need energy, energy is generated by tapping a foothold. Each foothold generates a specific kind of energy. There are several types of footholds that generate different forms of energy. Each card has an energy requirement in the bottom right corner, accompanied by a power origin symbol.

There are three colored forms of energy representing the Marvel™, DC™ and Independent multiverses; they are Red, Blue and Black respectively. There are six origin energies represented by six separate origin symbols. Depending on the format of game being played, the energy costs of a card can be paid with either origin or multiverse energy.

Characters and items will have both a mutiverse energy cost and an origin symbol. Incidents have a colorless energy cost which can be paid by either type of foothold. Ex: Lobo has a cost of 7 energy, the color blue represents the DC™ universe so to put this card in play I will need to tap 7 DC™ footholds. Alternatively If I am playing with an origins deck Lobo has an Alien symbol meaning I can tap 7 Alien footholds to pay his costs and put him in play.

Tapping

To tap a card is to turn it sideways. You do this when you use a foothold to make energy, when you attack with a character, or when you activate an ability that says a card need to be tapped to activate the ability. Most cards require the activation of an ability by tapping; alternatively a card will say that an ability is active while the card is in play. When a card is tapped, it means it’s been used for the turn. You can’t tap it again until it’s been untapped (straightened out).

Sometimes an effect will tap a card. If this happens, you don’t get the effect you’d get if you chose to tap the card yourself; it means the card looses the ability to activate the ability that turn. At the beginning of each of your turns, you untap your tapped cards so you can use them again.

Items and Incidents

Now that you can make energy, you’ll want to use it put cards into play. All cards except footholds cost energy. You can only play characters and items during the recruit, equip and evacuate step of your post-combat phase, different kinds of incidents can be played during different phases throughout the turn and cannot be played during certain times. Only one foothold can be brought into play each turn during the establish foothold step of your pre-combat phase.

Playing incidents

To play an incident, take the card you want to play from your hand, tap the foothold necessary to pay its costs and place it face up on playing surface.

Activation: Certain incidents must be played at a specific time while others may be played during different phases.

Response activation cards are played when your opponent takes an action. These incidents usually negate an opponent action when an opponent triggers an ability, puts a specific card into play, or moves a character to or from their holding area. Ex [Unspecified Card] says “play when opponent equips a character with a magical item”, this incident card must be played only if your opponent attaches an item with the magical origin symbol to a character.

Timed activation cards are played during specific phases of the game. There are three times these cards can be played during upkeep, during combat and during downtime and take effect immediately unless otherwise specified. Ex [Unspecified Card] says “play when an opponent character makes an attack with a firearm”, this incident card must be played only during your opponent’s combat phase and if your opponent makes an attack with a character using a firearm based attack.

Ambiguous activation cards can be played during any pre-combat and post-combat phases. There are no activation requirements on these cards accept that the target of the incident must be the players turn in which it is played. Ex [Unspecified Card] says “play on any character”, this incident card may be played on any of your opponent’s characters during their pre-combat or post combat phase or you may play the same card on your own characters during your pre-combat or post combat phase but you may not play this card on your opponent’s characters during your turn.

Target and Effect: Each incident will have a specific effect on one or more cards. The effect is what the card does. The target is which cards will be affected when the incident comes into play.

Character targets specify a single character will be subject to the effects of the incident card. This may be one of your characters or one of your opponents. If a card does not specify you may play the incident on any character of your choice.

Player targets specify a single player will be subject to the effects of the incident card. This incident usually effects all of a player’s characters but may also effect items or incidents. You are a player and in turn these incident cards may also be played on you by your opponent or may be played on yourself. Ex [Unspecified card] says “all of target player’s characters lose their ability to fly”, in this case you may play this card on your opponent or yourself.

Open Targets affect all cards regardless of the player that controls them. They may often target specific traits or specific types of cards but both players are subject to their effects. Ex [Unspecified card] says “place a marker on all mutants in play, they are D-1”, whether you or your opponent controls a character with the Mutant label these characters become D-1.

Duration: All good things must come to an end and the same is true for must incidents. Each incident has a duration letting players know how long they last. Unless otherwise specified all incidents begin to take effect as soon as they come into play.

Immediate incidents happen in the blink of an eye; the effect is applied and ends instantly. This can be used no negate or perform an action you would not normally be allowed to perform. Ex [Unspecified card] says “return one character from your graveyard to your hand”, this happens once and the incident is discarded.

Conditional incidents depend on conditions of the game to be true and if at any time the effects can no longer take effect then the incident is discarded. Conditional incidents will state what conditions must be true to be in effect and when to discard the card. Ex [Unspecified card] says “as long as target player controls any Alien characters, your characters cost 1 less energy to play. Discard when opponent no longer controls any Aliens.”, this card is played on an opponent when at least one of their characters bears an Alien origins symbol; it reduces your future character’s energy requirements by 1 only as long as your opponent controls Aliens if they don’t at any time the card is discarded. Even if they bring an Alien into play the following turn the card must be discarded once the conditions have been fulfilled.

Permanent incidents remain in play until the game ends or another card removes the incident, these cards have no duration indicated meaning they have no end to their effects. Ex [Unspecified card] says “target character gains Cybernetics, stats are boosted to C=5, D=5”, the character this card affects gains the label Cyborg and increases where possible its stats to C=5, D=5. If an opponent plays a card the “disables all cybernetics” then this card would be discarded.

Playing Items

Most items are played by paying their energy costs and placing them on a character. The character then gains certain abilities and powers from item. There are three types of items defined by how they act, in game some items may act like one category of item and be labeled as another; in this case the label serves as a means of targeting the item with incident cards.

Weapons are played on a character and allow that character to attack with the weapon. While an item does not usually remove a character’s innate abilities a weapon must be used to gain any benefits. Weapons will often boost a character’s attack strength when in use.

Devices are typically played on a character and allow that character to activate an ability. The character must usually activate the device by tapping and thus sacrifice an attack to use the device. A device may often boost a character’s attack or defense but most often will grant a character access to a particular ability.

Artifacts do not normally require character intervention they merely have a constant effect. Some artifacts may but put into play without a character while others must be attached to a character. The majority of artifacts will either grant a character an ability or increase their base attack or defense values.

Items attached to characters may be disabled by a successful attack against the character in possession of the item in place of a wound to that character. An item that can be disabled can be repaired by a character with tech, any character with tech may tap to repair the item. An item that cannot be disabled may be knocked away instead, but may be recovered by the character tapping but taking no other action, this is a Universal ability. An item that cannot be disabled will indicate that it cannot be disabled. An item that cannot be disabled or knocked away will indicate this; in this case only an incident card that targets this kind of item can remove the item from play.

Some items are more fragile and will indicate that it is destroyed if disabled. Independent artifacts act like characters and have a defense value. They can be attacked directly and defended. Independent artifacts are disabled if wounded and a second successful attack will destroy the artifact removing it to the discard pile.

Boosting Numbers

Many items and Incident cards will enhance or diminish a character’s powers or their combat or defense value. There are a number of ways to change a character’s stats, the most common way of diminishing a character’s statistics is by subtracting a fixed amount, and alternatively a card may also increase a character’s stats by adding a fixed amount. Ex [Super Soldier Serum] says “Boost stats by +3C, +3D…” if played on a character with C4, D3; this character’s new stats will be C7, D6. Many times there will be limitations placed on a card that will inhibit a character from becoming too powerful. These cards will indicate that a character will gain a certain amount to a maximum or minimum value. Ex [Super Soldier Serum] says “…to a maximum of C:6, D:6”, if played on the same character with C4, D3; this character’s new stats will be C6, D6.

When increasing a character’s stats you will more commonly you will find that cards amalgamate a character’s stats; this allows a character’s stats to increase without over powering them using multiple cards. When a card amalgamates a character’s stats the greater numbers on either card will apply so if a character has a higher stat it won’t be lowered unless the card specifies that this is a drawback. Ex [Elite Training] says “target character stats are boosted to C:3, D:3”, if played on a character with C1, D3; this character’s new stats will be C3, D3.

One other way of increasing a character’s power is by using dice. A die will be referred to as 1d6; this indicates that you want 1 die with 6 sides, at times you will be asked to role more than 1 die. This adds an element of chaos to boosting a character’s numbers you may gain a small boost or an incredible one or in some cases a character’s stats may be reduced. Ex [Radiation Exposure] says “target character… boosts each stat to 2d6”, if played on a character with C=5, D=5 we may end up with a character with C:12, D:12 but we are just as likely to get a character with C:2, D:2.

Many times there will be limitations placed on a card that will inhibit a character from becoming too powerful. These cards will indicate that a character will gain a certain amount to a maximum or minimum value.

Finally some items are only meant for certain characters and have a requirement to use them, if a character does not meet the requirement then that character can’t use them.

Gaining Labels

Often when an incident or item is played on a specific character they will be enhanced in some way but with this great power comes great responsibility and characters will often gain new labels in this way. A card will specify that a character “gains label, and (some other effects)” as in the previous example with Cybernetics. As long as this card affects the character they are considered to have this label.

Markers

Many cards have an effect that lasts more than one turn to help a player keep track of multiple events and the passage of time it is recommended that a player use markers to signify events. Markers could be anything from glass beads or coins to little scraps of paper.

It is recommended that you use at least three different colors because many cards may use markers for different reasons. You may use markers to count down removing a marker at a specific time each turn or when a player performs a specific action, you may use a marker to show an accumulation towards a final objective, you may use markers to show wounds, or indicate a target of a specific effect.

Characters

Characters are the core of Epic; all other cards support your characters. Characters are able to attack and when they are disabled generate points towards winning the game. There are several parts to a character card that are essential to play that will be covered in this section.

Abilities

Abilities are located in two places on a character card. Some abilities are common to many characters and are included in the labels section of the card; explanations for common abilities are included in the glossary of this rulebook. Special abilities are described in the text box and are often unique to one or a few characters. There are two types of abilities that are activated in different ways.

Triggered Abilities: A triggered ability happens when a specific event occurs in the game. A common trigger is when a character enters play or when a character is attacked. For example, Yorick™ has a special ability that says “The last man: when Yorick comes into play all other male characters are discarded…” A triggered ability will happen as soon as the trigger happens. Some abilities happen as an automatic reaction to an event while others give the player a choice either of effects or whether or not to act at all.

Activated Abilities: An activated ability has a price, it does not occur because a character exists but rather because a character chooses to act. The price of activation is often that a character loses its ability to attack and replaces it with a special action. For example a character may choose to teleport another character to safety. To do so you would tap the character as if it attacked but its action is replaced by a special ability; that character will untap next turn but may not attack or use any other abilities that require it to tap until its player’s next turn.

Random Abilities: to generate a random ability roll 6d6 and add the result to achieve a total between 6 and 36. Each number 6-36 will correspond to a number on the Random Ability List.

Random Ability List:

06 = Defensive Teleport: a random ability, this character can tap to move to the staging area and may bring one other character.

07 = Double Strike: a random ability, this character will deal two wounds with each attack. Each wound is counted as a separate attack.

08 = Fear:  a random ability, this character cannot be blocked unless opponent performs a Heroic Act.

09 = Flight: a random ability, during upkeep place or remove a marker on this character to signify flight. when in flight, this character cannot be attacked in close combat and cannot attack another character in close combat while in flight unless that character is flying as well.

10 = Heal: a random ability, this character may tap to recover from 1 injury.

11 = Defensive Increase: a random ability, this character gains +D6 to base D

12 =  Intangible: a random ability, during upkeep place or remove a marker on this character they may not attack unless the marker is removed but are immune to attacks (except psi and magic) while there is a marker on this character.

13 = Invisible: a random ability, during upkeep place or remove a marker on this character; this character may not be attacked by a character that they did not attack in the previous turn. They may also not benefit from heroic act or blocking while there is a marker on this character.

14 = Invulnerable: a random ability, this character cannot be killed.

15 = Keen Senses: a random ability, this character ignores stealth, shape shifting and invisibility.

16 = Mimic: a random ability, this character has the ability to mimic other common abilities once per turn with the exception of Immune, Invulnerable and Resurrect, which can only be mimicked once per game.

17 = Offensive Teleport: a random ability, this character can tap to move one of their opponent’s characters back into that player’s hand.

18 = Personal Teleport: a random ability, this character can tap to move to the staging area.

19 = Poison: a random ability, place a marker on target after a successful C attack, Target character is -1D until marker is removed. Markers are cumulative.

20 = Possess: a random ability, an opponent character gains a marker after a successful attack from this character with base C. Your character remains tapped and the opponent character may attack as though it is under your control. Your opponent may attack this character during their combat phase, un-tap this character to remove the marker.

21 = Regenerate: a random ability, this character recovers from 1 injury at the start of each turn, even if they are killed (if this happens only “insane” characters can attack this character the turn it returns from the dead.

22 = Rejuvenate:  a random ability, this character may tap to heal 1 injury to any character including him/her self.

23 = Resurrect: a random ability, this character may tap to return a character from the killed pile into your holding area.

24= Swarm: a random ability, tap the character to create a marker. Each marker represents another version of the character and has the same abilities as the initial card. Markers are not worth points.

25 = Stealth: a random ability, this character comes into play with a marker, they may not be attacked until they attack first, when this character attacks remove the marker, they may tap to replace this marker.

26 = Strategic Teleport: a random ability, this character can tap to move themselves or another character to the holding area.

27 = Super speed: a random ability, this character may declare two attacks in the combat phase.

28 = Technopathy: a random ability, this character may tap to repair or disable one piece of equipment in play.

29 = Vampirism: a random ability, If this character injures another character in close combat they recover one wound.

30 = Super Strength: a random ability, this character gains +D6 to base C and thrown objects: 6

31= Counter attack: a random ability, if this character is attacked they may immediately attack that character in response unless disabled.

32= Reach: a random ability, character may attack flying characters with C.

33= Rage: a random ability, a character must attack if they are able to and may attack with +1C, -1D.

34= Insane: a random ability, this character may not benefit from Teamwork or Leadership but may kill any other character and ignore Fear.

35= Immune: (Random Power): a random ability, this character is unaffected by the random power rolled.

36= Enslave: a random ability, an opponent character gains a marker after a successful attack from this character. The opponent character may attack as though it is under your control. Your opponent may attack this character during their combat phase, if your character is wounded discard the marker.

Stats

Characters have two basic Statistics or “Stats” at the top of each card. Character cards are the only cards with stats because they are normally the only cards able to attack and/or defend. The two basic stats are “C” and “D”, signifying a character’s combat and defensive capabilities respectively. These numbers incorporate a character’s speed, strength, agility and endurance meaning that some characters may have higher numbers than you might expect but because no character would stand still in combat their ability to take a bullet and dodge a bullet are valued equally.

When attacking in close range combat against another character your character’s “C” is compared to the opponent’s “D”; if your character’s “C” is higher they are wounded, if the opposite is true the opponent’s character escapes your attack unscathed. Not all characters are bare handed, some have items included in their stats, knocking these items away will decrease their stats. Treat any items listed on a card like an attached item, unless otherwise specified it can be knocked away.

Powers

Not all characters fight hand to hand, often a character will be able to throw a car across the battlefield or blast an opponent with a beam of energy. These powers allow a character to use alternative attacks other than their base stats; unless otherwise specified however this does not permit a character to attack twice in a single turn. There are seven powered attacks a character can use to wound its opponent. Each one has a power stat which the character uses in place of its C. For example Green Lantern™ has an Energy Blast: 8, this means he is able to make an attack with a value of 8 strength in place of his normal C attack.

Psi: a blast of mental energy or an attack on the thoughts of another individual. Armor or physical resistance has no effect because the damage takes place in the mind. To defend against a Psi attack take a character’s base D, or a character’s Psi value as their defense. Characters with Psi may also use it to defend against physical attacks in place of their base D if they are untapped. Latent Psi may only be used for defense.

Energy Blast: This is a blast of energy projected by the character; this can be in various forms such as plasma, heat, cold, sound, electricity, or light. Most characters will specify a particular type of energy blast.

Magic Blast: There are various forms of Magic in the game and in this case Magic acts as a blast of arcane energies. Magic blast may also be used in place of D if a character is untapped.

Matter blast: This is a blast of matter produced or collected by the character; this can be in various forms such as water, wind or ice. Most characters will specify a particular type of matter.

Thrown Object: In most cases characters will find themselves surrounded by scenery.  Strong characters can use their strength to hurl physical objects through the air at their opponents.

Projectile: This is a specific object thrown or projected by the character. The character must usually tap to regain the projectile.

Firearm: this is a weapon that the character uses to grant him/her a ranged attack. It counts as an item that the character has equipped. While a firearm launches a projectile unless otherwise specified a character is considered to have unlimited ammunition.

Random Power: to generate a random power, roll 1d6, 1-2 will give you Psi, 3-4 will give you Energy Blast and 5-6 will give you Matter Blast. From this point, if you rolled 3-6 you will have to roll 1d6 to obtain a specific type of energy or matter blast each number will correspond to a different type on the Random Power List. Finally regardless of which power you have you will have to roll 2d6 to obtain a value for your power.

Random Power List

Energy Blast:

1 = plasma,

2 = heat,

3 = cold,

4 = sound,

5 = electricity

6 = light

Matter blast:

1 = Water

2 = Acid

3 = Wind

4 = Organic Projectile

5 = Ice

6 = Sand

Labels

Characters often have similar origins to other characters; some belong to the same team or share a trait that gives them a label. These labels allow groups of characters to be targeted by special attacks. Some characters have abilities that many other characters also possess, for this reason these abilities are given a “keyword”. Detailed explanations of each of these abilities can be found in the glossary at the end of this rulebook. Keyword abilities are no different from special abilities found in the text box but the keyword allows these characters to be targeted by cards affecting certain abilities.

Combat

To win a game of Epic you must attack your opponent’s characters with your own characters. An attack is successful when the strength of your character’s attack is greater than the strength of your opponent’s character’s defense. After a successful attack your opponent places a marker on their character to indicate that they have been injured. After a second successful attack on the same character it is rendered inactive, this means the character has been knocked unconscious or is so badly injured that it is no longer capable of attack. When a character becomes inactive you gain points equal to that character’s energy costs and the energy costs of any equipment attached to the character. A third successful attack will kill a character and remove it from play into your opponent’s graveyard. You do not get any extra points from killing an opponent’s characters. Most characters cannot kill another character; only characters with the Villain or Anti-Hero trait may kill another character (see the glossary for more details).

The middle of each turn is the combat phase. (You’ll learn about the parts of the turn in section 3.) In your combat phase, you choose which of your characters will attack, how they will attack, and which characters they will attack. Unless otherwise specified a character may only attack one other character per turn. To attack you tap your character and tell your opponent of the attack. Ideally all of your characters attack at the same time but you and your opponent may decide to resolve one combat at a time. Under no circumstance may you change the target of an attack once it has been declared to your opponent. You can attack with a character only if it’s untapped, and only if it is on the battlefield.

If your opponent has another character on the same team as the character you are attacking, that character may block the attack. If a character blocking an attack has a lower defensive strength than the attack strength it is injured and if its defense strength is higher, then the attack has no effect. Tapped characters cannot block. Only one character may block an attack for another character, in this regard the blocking character becomes the character under attack; nothing happens to the original target of the attack accept it cannot be targeted by another attack in the same turn. A character that has an attack declared against it may not block an attack on another character without receiving an automatic wound. If the character chooses to block regardless of attacks against it the blocking proceeds as though no attacks were declared on the blocking character and each declared attack allocates an automatic wound in the aftermath.

For example player 1 controls Majestic™ and Grifter™ while player 2 controls Blade™ and Black Panther™. If player 2 attacks Majestic with Blade and Grifter with Black Panther; Grifter will be wounded but Majestic will be uninjured because Blade is not strong enough to wound him. If player 1 has a plan for Grifter they may use Majestic to block the attack against Grifter, because Black Panther is also not strong enough to wound Majestic he remains unscathed; however because Majestic turned his back on his attacker he receives an automatic wound from Blade even though normally Blade would be unable to injure him. If player 2 had declared 3 attackers on Majestic and player 1 decided to block the attack on Grifter majestic would block the attack and receive 3 automatic wounds from his attackers, killing him even if his attackers could not normally wound him.

There are times when a single character may be the target of several attacks. In this case each attack resolves in the sequence in which they were declared. If the target character is killed before all of the attacks against it have resolved the remaining attacks are negated but the attacking characters remain tapped for the rest of the turn. If a character blocks an attack on a teammate from multiple attackers the blocking character absorbs all of the attacks. If the blocking character is killed in the onslaught the remaining attacks are then allocated to the original target. For example: player 1 has 4 characters, The Joker™, Mr. Freeze™, Catwoman™ and Scarecrow™, player 2 has Batman™ and Robin™. Player 1 attacks Robin with all 4 characters but because Robin is part of team “Batman” player 2 can choose to block with Batman. If player 2 chooses to block with Batman and each attack is strong enough to injure Batman, 3 of the 4 attacks will hit, killing him; the final attack will be allocated to Robin. If player 2 chooses not to block, Robin will take all 4 attacks declared against him, if 3 of the 4 attacks are strong enough to injure him the final attack is negated but the attacker remains tapped. Even though a hero cannot kill another character it may deliver a killing blow to a blocking character.

Section 3: Game Play

Now that you know all of the basic components and aspects of the game it’s time to discuss how the game is played from start to finish.

Set-up

First you’ll need a few pretty obvious things to play. You’ll need a deck of Epic cards. You’ll also need a way to keep track of point totals. Finally, you’ll need an opponent. Your opponent will play against you using his or her own deck.

You play a game of Epic with your own customized deck. You build it yourself using any Epic cards you want. Before a game you and your opponent decide on a point value for the game. The game’s point value should be half of the point value for your deck, or equal to the amount of character points in each players deck. For example a 200 point deck should have a game point value of 100, but if one player only has 80 points worth of characters then the game point value should be 80 allowing his opponent a better chance of obtaining that many points.

Your deck must have at least 40 cards, and both players must use a deck with the same number of points. Footholds have no point value, the energy cost of a card is the same s its point value.

Your deck should be composed of at least 20 footholds and it’s a good idea to have footholds make up close to half of your deck. About half of any deck’s point cost should be character cards and most of the remaining points spent on incidents and items. Items can be quite powerful and useful at times but can also be removed and destroyed more easily than incidents that remain with a character for the duration of the game; for this reason incident cards should significantly out number item cards.

After you play with your new deck for a while, you can start to customize it. Take out cards you don’t feel are working well and add new cards you want to try. It is recommended to focus on cards that can be paid for by a single type of foothold. This increases the odds that you will build up enough resources to play your full deck.

Decide which player will go first. If you’ve just played the same opponent, the loser of the last game decides who goes first. Otherwise, roll a die or flip a coin to see who gets to decide.

Each player shuffles his or her deck and then draws a hand of seven cards to start. If you draw a hand with no footholds, you can redraw. Show your opponent your hand, shuffle your hand back into your deck and draw a new hand of seven cards. You can do this twice; you must keep your third hand.

When a card contradicts the rulebook, the card wins. Certain cards may allow you to bend rules, even break them.

Parts of the Turn

Below are the parts of a turn. Each turn proceeds in the same sequence. The active player (the player whose turn it is) gets to play cards and activate abilities and then the other player does. When both players have nothing more to do in a phase the game will move to the next step. With each part of the turn is a description of what can happen during that part, if it’s your turn.

1. Beginning Phase

Un-tap: You un-tap all your tapped cards. Characters (or other cards with activated abilities) that attacked or used an ability during the previous turn became tapped, this reverts them to a battle ready state. On the first turn of the game, you don’t have any tapped cards, so you just skip this step. An opponent cannot trigger any abilities or play any incidents during this step.

Upkeep: This is considered the beginning of your character’s turn. Some abilities require you to take certain steps before beginning combat and upkeep is when these steps take place. An opponent may play incident cards or trigger abilities if they are specified to take effect during your opponent’s upkeep or at the beginning of your opponent’s turn. During upkeep an opponent’s actions happen first; at any other time the active player’s turn has priority. Finally any effects from the previous turn that last a single turn end now.

Draw: If you have less than seven cards in your hand you will draw enough cards from your resources to fill your hand. If you already have seven cards then draw one card. (The player who goes first skips the draw step on his or her first turn to make up for the advantage of going first). If a player runs out of resources they continue to play, but can no-longer draw cards. An opponent cannot trigger any abilities or play any incidents during this step.

2. Pre-combat Phase

Establish foothold: each turn you may put one foothold into play. If you have no footholds in your hand on your first turn you may return all the cards in your hand to the resource pile. Reshuffle your resources and redraw another seven cards. You may only call redraw twice per game; you must keep your third hand. You must show your disgarded hand to your opponent before returning the cards to your resources. An opponent cannot trigger any abilities or play any incidents during this step.

Trigger abilities: during this step active cards in play can activate special abilities.

Play Incidents: Incident cards come into play before combat begins, some of these incidents take place long before the battle ever began while others happen instantaneously; in battle time is relative. Incidents may last for the duration of your turn in which case then will be removed during your next upkeep; others may last for the duration of the game.

3. Combat Phase

Declare attackers: You decide which, if any, of your untapped characters will attack, and which characters they will attack, then they do so. This taps the attacking characters.

Declare blockers: Your opponent decides which, if any, of his or her characters teammates will block your attacking characters, they then do so.

Play Incidents: Incident cards may come into play during combat; these incidents must specify that they are to be played during combat. Incidents played during combat take immediate effect and are immediately discarded after that effect takes place.

Determine results: compare the attacker’s attack value to the defender’s defense value making sure to include all modifiers from items, incidents and abilities. If the attacker’s attack value is equal to or greater than the defender’s defense value then the defending character is wounded. Continue determining the results for each conflict.

4. Post Combat Phase

Recruit, Equip and Evacuate: During this step a you can play or move a limited number of characters and items. Your limiting factor is the number of footholds in play. To put a character or item into play tap enough footholds to pay your card’s energy requirements and place the card into play. At this time you may also move any number of characters to your holding area.

To move a character from play you must pay half of their energy cost rounded up and move it to the holding area, while there, a character will be healed of all wounds. A character may be brought into play and moved to the holding area on the same turn as long as the energy costs are paid for both movements. Any items and incidents attached to the character may move to the holding area at no additional cost but must remain attached to the character. Any number of characters in play (dead characters are not in play) may be moved to the holding area as long as you can generate the energy to move them. Any character that comes into play from your holding area or your hand is at full health.

Trigger abilities: during this step active cards in play can activate special abilities if they were not activated during the pre-combat phase.

Play Incidents: Some incident cards come into play after combat ends, some of these incidents take place during the battle and others happen instantaneously; in battle, time is relative. Incidents may last for the duration of your turn in which case then will be removed during your next upkeep; others may take effect and be removed instantly.

5. End Phase

Downtime: any abilities that activate during downtime activate during this step. Players may also play any incidents that may occur during downtime or at the end of a player’s turn.

Discard: If you have more than seven cards in your hand, choose and discard cards until you have only seven. If you have seven cards or less you may skip this step or you may choose to discard one card. An opponent cannot trigger any abilities or play any incidents during this step.

End Game

Now it’s your opponent’s turn. That player starts their beginning phase and continues through each phase in order. After that player is done, it will be your turn again. Continue play until one player obtains the agreed upon point value for the game. If a player has no characters in play and runs out of resources, the game ends at the end of their turn and the other player wins.

Section 4: Alternative play

You now know everything you need to play a game of Epic. The last thing to decide is what kind of game will you play? There are a number of variations possible to a standard game of epic, as well as a number of non standard versions. The only limit to epic is that you and your opponent must agree on the type of game you will play. Regardless of the variations and format of the game, the rules of the turn outlined in the previous section must be respected.

Standard Format

In a standard game a player has a choice of a multiverse deck, where each player builds his or her own deck around a single color. Each color represents a different multiverse, restricting a player to a limited set of cards while allowing for a better cohesion between that player’s characters. Because a player will have a single color of foothold in their deck, cards can be played sooner and more frequently. Drawing power from an entire Multiverse also allows a player access to a broader range of characters and items.

Alternatively a player may choose to play with an origin deck where each player builds their own deck around a single origin symbol. Each symbol represents a different origin energy. Like the Multiverse format, this restricts the type of cards a player can have in their deck. Because a player will have access to a range of characters from all the multiverses however, it gives the game a different feel and allows for a more unique experience than the battles typically portrayed in comic books. Like a multiverse deck, players will have a single type of foothold, thus cards can be played sooner and more frequently.

Either deck is permitted in all formats of Epic at all times. The rules as stated in this rulebook apply to the Standard Format; all other formats alter the rules from the standard game.

Campaign Format

The Campaign Format is a non-standard format of Epic. In a standard game each player has a deck of cards they play their cards against one another until they reach an agreed upon point value or the opponent has runs out of cards with no other cards in play. In Campaign Format you play a series of battles with intermissions between them. The goal is not only to eliminate your opponent’s characters but to do so strategically while minimizing your losses.

To win a campaign game you must accumulate the agreed upon number of points just like in the standard game; there are however no point restrictions in a campaign game and they often have a higher point value than a standard game. The more points required to win, the longer a campaign will last. Normally the point value for a campaign game is half the value of each player’s deck and each player’s deck should have at least the campaign point value in character cards.

Setting up a campaign game is the same as a standard game with one exception before starting the game you must decide how many points each battle of the campaign will be worth. Usually a battle is half or a third of the campaign total. Each battle does not need to have the same point value and you may have any number of battles as long as both players agree beforehand.

Killing characters in a campaign game is different from a standard game because a long campaign can come to an abrupt and disappointing end when a player runs out of cards. For this reason a player will loose points equal to a character’s energy costs and that of any attached equipment for any character they kill.

The intermission is an extra phase between each battle of the campaign game. There are two steps to the intermission phase.

Total points: during intermission is the only one time a character can win a campaign game. When totaling points if a player has reached the agreed upon total for the campaign that player will win and the campaign is over. If both players have reached the total point limit for the campaign then the player with the most points wins.

Move characters: any characters in a player’s graveyard or discard pile will remain there during intermission. Active characters in play enter the holding area and if injured, are returned to full health; these characters may be recruited during the next battle. Just as in a standard game you may move no more than 30 points of cards into your holding area, during intermission however the holding area capacity is doubled to 60 points; any extra cards must be discarded. Any characters that were inactive are discarded during this phase and any cards in your hand at the end of a battle are reshuffled into your resources during this phase.

The next battle of the campaign starts much like the first only the player who lost the previous battle may choose which player starts the next battle.

Multiplayer Format

The multiplayer format of the game follows the typical standard game rules and has two variations, teams and free-for-all.

Teams allow an even number of players to form alliances and attack multiple opponents. An even number of opponents form an alliance against another team of an even number of opponents, with the goal of accumulating enough points collectively to win the game. The point value for a team game should be twice that of a standard game. All other rules of the standard game apply. A player’s partner controls their own characters and may only play cards on their own characters. The main variation to a team game is that a team becomes a target player and both players may suffer from and gain from player effects. For example if a single player controls a characters bearing a “cyborg” label then a card targeting a player with “cyborgs in play” targets both team members. If one player may activate a character’s ability that affects another character they control, they may choose to target their teammate’s character; unless the action would force a character to change player control. For example a player may use strategic teleport to move their partner’s character to the holding area but may not use defensive teleport because their character would have to move to the same holding area forcing that character or their partner’s character to change player control.

Free for all takes the standard game and lets you play against multiple opponents. There are no set opponents and they may vary from one turn to another. Just like playing teams it is recommended that a free-for-all has twice the point value of a standard game. A free for all game is about strategy, the first player to accumulate the required number of points wins which means you must minimizing your losses while maximizing your victories. Wheeling and dealing is a normal part of a free-for-all and alliances can be quickly forged and broken in battle. Make sure to keep track of which characters have attacked and which abilities have been used as the number of players increases so too does the level of difficulty.

Other Options

Mixed deck: If diversity of characters is important to you then a mixed deck is ideal. Normally in standard format a deck will be built around a single multiverse or origin type. In a mixed deck a player chooses to build around two multiverses or origin types. Multiple types of footholds slow a player’s ability to play cards as they wait to draw the footholds they need. Multiple energy sources however allow a player to access cards that normally cannot be played together.

Taking a mixed deck even further, there is no reason a player cannot play with all three multiverses or a mixed origin and multiverse deck. The advantage of using all three multiverses is that a player will have access to all cards available in the game; mixing origin and multiverse allows a player to diversify their deck and allows players to pay for single cards through multiple means. If a deck is built around a single origin symbol and multiverse color several cards may bear both of these energy types allowing the player to play this subsection of characters regardless of which foothold they draw first.

Restricted variations: some players prefer characters they complement each other or games that follow an overlying theme. A restricted variation imposes an artificial restriction on both players requiring them to choose cards based on a single attribute. There are numerous variations to this, for example one player may play with “heroes” and the other with “villains”; players may restrict decks to individual universes such as “Image” or “Top-Cow” or players may choose to use themed decks like “mutants” or “aliens”. Regardless of the choices made both players must agree to abide by the restrictions and make them as clear as possible. Where a conflict arises it is a good idea to keep a coin on hand, it may save a friendship.

Countdown variation: Point limits are not for everyone or you may find that a limited amount of time is available; in this case the countdown variation of Epic is a good choice. Run like a standard game the only change is in the set-up of the game. Before starting, rather than choosing a point value for the game, choose a number of turns. Place markers equal to the number of turns agreed upon aside and at the start of the first player’s turn discard one. On the turn in which the first player discards the final marker, the end of the second player’s turn will signal the end of the game.

The countdown variation may also be applied to the campaign format limiting the number of turns in each battle allowing players to play an unlimited number of battles until the agreed upon point value is reached during intermission.

Section 5: Glossary

Abilities:  skills or powers that characters possess that allow them to take actions other than attacking and blocking.

Activated Abilities: are abilities that are caused by a character taking action, this normally requires a character to forgo their attack, replacing it with the action.

Activation: the requirements needed to be fulfilled to make a card function.

Active:  a character that is in play and able to make attacks.

Alien Origin: energy linked to a character whose powers are tied to extra terrestrial worlds.

Ambiguous activation cards: incident cards that may be played during either pre or post-combat phases and have no other requirements other than being player during the target’s turn.

Anti-Hero: a common ability, the character is able to kill another character with the Villain label.

Arch-enemy: (X) a common ability, this character has the ability to lock character (X) in combat so that both characters can not affect other characters in play until one of the two locked characters is disabled.

Artifact: an item that takes immediate effect and does not need a character to act in order to generate its effects.

Attack: when a player uses one character in an attempt to defeat another.

Basic foothold: any foothold without a cost and produces only 1 unit of energy each turn.Battlefield: the area on the playing field dedicated to cards in play.

Beginning Phase: the part of the turn where a player recuperates from the previous turn and prepares for the current one.

Beyonder: an omnipotent being from a realm outside of the multitude of multiverses, this is the role each player plays in the game.

Blocking: a universal ability, a character on the same Team as another may absorb the damage from a single attack on that character. The blocking character taps to do so.

Campaign Format: A game format where several games are shortened and bridged by a series of intermissions allowing players to play a longer more strategically complex game.

Card Image: a picture of the character as it appears on the card.

Card Name: the name of a character, item, or event, how we tell each of the cards apart from one another.

Card Types: the category a card belongs to, there are four types of cards in the game character, item, incident and foothold; each has different properties and can perform in different ways.

Character: a being capable of making attacks and being attacked.

Character targets: character cards affected by the action taken by another card.

Character type: the race or species a character identifies with.

Combat: the act of one character attacking and another character responding to the attack.

Combat Value: the measurement of a character’s ability to injure another character.

Combat Phase: The part of the turn where a player’s characters attack the opponent’s characters.

Common abilities: a skill or power that many characters possess.

Conceal:  a common ability, this character may not be attacked until he/she first attacks.

Conditional incidents: incident cards that depend on circumstances of the game to be true in order to have an effect.

Conditional Origin: energy linked to a character whose powers are tied to skill, training and life changing experiences.

Countdown variation: an altered version of the game where point goals are replaced by turn counters and the player that accumulates the most points at the end of the countdown wins.

Counter attack: a common and random ability, if this character is attacked they may immediately attack that character in response unless disabled.

Cyborg: a common ability, this character is enhanced by mechanical systems integrated into their body. If a character with the Tech ability makes a successful attack against this character they may choose to disable the cybernetics rather than cause a wound. This character becomes C:2, D:2 and looses all abilities related to cybernetics.

Damage: the result of a character’s combat value being higher than their opponent’s defense value.

Dead: when a character receives enough damage to generate a third wound. The character is still considered inactive, but is now removed from play in enters its controlling player’s graveyard.

Declare attackers: The first step of the Combat Phase when a player identifies which characters are attacking which of the opponent’s characters.

Declare blockers: The second step of the Combat Phase where the opponent identifies which characters will receive damage from the attack, and which characters will block.

Defense Value: the measurement of a character’s ability to resist injury.

Defensive Increase: a random ability, this character gains +D6 to base D

Defensive Teleport: a common and random ability, this character can tap to move to the staging area and may bring one other character.

Destroyed: when an item that cannot be disabled or knocked away absorbs a wound in place of a character. The item is discarded as a result.

Determine results: The final step of the Combat Phase when both players tabulate the attack and defense value of each combat and assign wounds based on the results.

Device: an item that requires a character to activate it in order to take effect.

Disabled (item): the state of an item that has been directly attacked or under the effect of another card. A disabled item can only be repaired by a character with the “Tech” ability.

Disabled (character): the state of a character who has received enough damage to generate a second wound. The character may not attack as long as it is disabled and is now considered inactive.

Discard: the act of removing a card from the game and placing it in the discard pile. This is also the final step of the turn if a player has more than seven cards in their hand.

Discards (discard pile): the pile of cards on the playing field that are no-longer in play or for some other reason could not be played.

Double Strike: a common and random ability, this character will deal two wounds with each attack. Each wound is counted as a separate attack.

Downtime: The first step of the End Phase where players may activate any abilities and play any incidents intended to happen at the end of their turn.

Draw: the final step of the beginning phase where a player will draw cards to replenish their hand.

Draw cards: the act of removing cards from a player’s resources into their hand.

Duration: how long an effect lasts.

Effect: what a card will do when put in play.

End Phase: The final Phase of the turn when a player resolves any remaining issues and completes his turn.

Energy Blast: a character power, a blast of energy projected by the character; this can be in various forms such as plasma, heat, cold, sound, electricity, or light.

Energy Cost: the amount of energy required to put a card into play.

Enslave: a common and random ability, an opponent character gains a marker after a successful attack from this character. The opponent character may attack as though it is under your control. Your opponent may attack this character during their combat phase, if your character is wounded discard the marker.

Equipment: an item whose ability allows a character an augmented or altered defense and/or attack.

Establish foothold: The first step of the Pre-combat Phase where a player may put a new foothold into play.

Fear:  a common and random ability, this character cannot be blocked unless opponent performs a Heroic Act.

Firearm: a character power, this is a weapon that the character uses to grant him/her a ranged attack. It counts as an item that the character has equipped.

First player: The player who has the first turn of an individual game.

Flight: a common and random ability, during upkeep place or remove a marker on this character to signify flight. when in flight, this character cannot be attacked in close combat and cannot attack another character in close combat while in flight unless that character is flying as well.

Foothold: a door through time and space giving a Beyonder access to unlimited power. A foothold is represented as a card that a player taps to receive energy.

Free for all: a type of multiplayer format game where number of players act in self interest against a number of opponents.

Genetic Origin:  energy linked to a character whose powers are tied to their natural DNA.

Graveyard: the pile of cards on the playing field where dead characters are placed.

Hand: the cards drawn and have yet to enter play.

Heal: a common and random ability, this character may tap to recover from 1 injury.

Healthy: a character that has received no damage.

Hero: a universal ability, a character that normally fights to protect others and is morally opposed to killing. The majority of characters are heroes, any character not bearing a Villain or Anti-Hero label is considered a Hero.

Heroic Act: a universal ability, any Hero character may sacrifice a wound to save another character from being wounded even if tapped, this may only be done once per turn.

Holding Area: the area on the playing field where characters may go to recuperate from their injuries.

Immediate incidents: an incident whose effect is applied and ends instantly.

Immune: (X) a common and random ability, this character is unaffected by (X) type of attack.

Inactive: a character that is no-longer able to make attacks.

Incident: a card representing an event recreated from comic book history in the present of the game.

Independent artifacts: An item that has its own defense value. The item is played as though it were a character. It may be disabled like other items.

Injured: a character that has received enough damage to generate a single wound. The character is still considered active and able to attack.

Insane: a common and random ability, this character may not benefit from Teamwork or Leadership but may kill any other character and ignore Fear.

Intangible: a common and random ability, during upkeep place or remove a marker on this character they may not attack unless the marker is removed but are immune to attacks (except psi and magic) while there is a marker on this character.

Intermission: the added phase during campaign games where points are tallied and cards prepared for the next battle.

Invisible: a common and random ability, during upkeep place or remove a marker on this character this character may not be attacked by a character that they did not attack in the previous turn. They may also not benefit from Heroic Act or Blocking while there is a marker on this character.

Invulnerable: a common and random ability, this character cannot be killed.

Item: a specific object from comic book lore.

Keen Senses: a common and random ability, Character ignores stealth, shape shifting and invisibility.

Keyword: a label that signifies a common ability.

Knocked away: the state of an item after absorbing a wound in place of a character, the character may tap to recover the item during their turn.

Label: an identifying marker for a character as a sub set amongst a larger category of beings.

Latent Psi: a type of Psi that cannot be used for attack unless made un-latent.

Leader: a common ability, Characters that lead a team can add +1 to a either a Team member’s attack or defense for the remainder of the turn by tapping. A character may only benefit from leadership from 1 character, once per turn.

Magic: a common ability, this character has the ability to mimic all other common abilities once per turn with the exception of Immune, Invulnerable and Resurrect, which can only be mimicked once per game.

Magical Origin: energy linked to a character whose powers are tied to dimensions outside of the natural world.

Magic Blast: a character power, a magical blast of arcane energies.

Markers: physical objects that signify an action or event in the game.

Matter Blast: a character power, a blast of matter produced or collected by the character; this can be in various forms such as water, wind or ice.

Mimic: a common and random ability, this character has the ability to mimic common abilities of other characters in play once per turn with the exception of Immune, Invulnerable and Resurrect, which can only be mimicked once per game; and Magic, which cannot be mimicked.

Mixed deck: a deck of Epic cards based around a combination of Origin symbols and/or multiverse colors.

Move characters: the second step of the Intermission phase during a campaign game where disabled characters are discarded and injured characters are moved to the holding area to recuperate and prepare for the next battle.

Multiplayer Format: A game format where more than two players are present and active.

Multiverse: many parallel universes with common characters and histories.

Multiverse deck: a deck of Epic cards based around a single color representing a multiverse.

Non-standard: Any game format other than the Standard game.

Non-unique: a common ability, this character is not an individual but a non-specific representative; a player’s deck may have any number of copies of this type of character. All other characters are considered Unique and a player may only have one copy in their deck.

Offensive Teleport: a common and random ability, this character can tap to move one of their opponent’s characters back into that player’s hand.

Open Targets: all characters in play by either player.

Opponent: the player who opposes your victory.

Origin deck: a deck of Epic cards based around a single Origin symbol representing an Origin type.

Origin Energy: the energy that surrounds the creation of a character.

Origin Symbol(s): an icon representing the six origin energies.

Partner: the player who, in a team game, helps you to obtain a cooperative victory.

Permanent incidents: incidents that remain in play until the end of the game or until another card removes it from the game.

Personal Teleport: a common and random ability, this character can tap to move to the staging area.

Player: the person controlling the cards in play.

Player targets: the opponent whose characters are affected by the action taken by a card.

Play Incidents: The third step of the Pre or Post and Combat Phase where players may play certain incident cards to alter the results of combat.

Playing Field: the area in which all cards are placed.

Points: what is earned by an attacking player when a character becomes inactive. These points are accumulated toward the final point goal to win the game and are equal to the amount of energy required to bring a character and/or equipment into play.

Poison: a common and random ability, place a marker on target after a successful C attack, Target character is -1D until marker is removed. Markers are cumulative.

Possess: a common and random ability, an opponent character gains a marker after a successful attack from this character with base C. Your character remains tapped and the opponent character may attack as though it is under your control. Your opponent may attack this character during their combat phase, un-tap this character to remove the marker.

Post Combat Phase: The fourth phase of the turn where players will put cards into play and remove others in an effort to recuperate any losses during combat and better position themselves for the next round of combat.

Powers: a set of abilities that allow a character to replace one or both of their stats with another value during an attack or while defending.

Pre-combat Phase: the second phase of the turn when players will put cards into play to help characters in the impending combat.

Projectile: a character power, this is a specific object thrown or projected by the character. The character must usually tap to regain the projectile.

Psi: a character power, this is either a blast of energy or an attack on the thoughts of another using mental energy.

Publisher: the most recent/popular company to incorporate the character into stories.

Rage: a common and random ability, a character must attack if they are able to and may attack with +1C, -1D.

Random Abilities: an ability characters can obtain from an incident or special ability, to do so characters roll 5d6 and add the result to achieve a total between 5 and 30. Each number 5-30 will correspond to a number on the Random Ability List.

Random Ability List: a list of abilities representing most common abilities and some abilities used to approximate stat boosts innate to many characters.

Reach: a common and random ability, character may attack flying characters with C.

Recovered: the state of an item after it has been knocked away and the owner (character) has tapped to regain it.

Recruit, Equip and Evacuate: The first step of the Post Combat Phase where a player may bring any characters in their holding area back into play for free. They may also bring characters into play from their hand by tapping a number of footholds to generate the required energy to pay their costs; items may also be brought into play from a players hand in the same way. Players may also evacuate characters and their equipment to the holding area by paying half of their character cost rounded up.

Regenerate: a common and random ability, this character recovers from 1 injury at the start of each turn, even if they are killed (if this happens only “insane” characters can attack this character the turn it returns from the dead.

Rejuvenate:  a common and random ability, this character may tap to heal 1 injury to any character including him/her self.

Resistant: (X) a common ability, this character has a resistance against (X) type of attack; defense is increased by 3 against this kind of attack.

Resources: the pile of cards on the playing field that a player draws from to replenish cards in their hand.

Response activation cards: incident cards that are played when your opponent takes an action.

Restricted variations: an altered version of the game where players limit their deck by publisher or some other label.

Resurrect: a common and random ability, this character may skip tap to return a character from the killed pile into your holding area.

Special abilities: a skill or special power possessed by only a few individuals.

Standard Format: A game format involving all of the rules as presented in the basic rule book.

Stats: a character’s combat and defensive values.

Stealth: a common and random ability, this character comes into play with a marker, they may not be attacked until they attack first, when this character attacks remove the marker, they may tap to replace this marker.

Strategic Teleport: a common ability, this character can tap to move themselves or another character to the holding area.

Super speed: a common ability, this character may declare two attacks in the combat phase.

Super Strength: a random ability, this character gains +D6 to base C and thrown objects: 6

Swarm: a common ability, tap the character to create a marker. Each marker represents another version of the character and has the same abilities as the initial card. Markers are not worth points.

Tap: to turn a card sideways indicating that it has performed an action.

Target: what card(s) will be affected by the actions taken by a player.

Team: (X) Characters on the same team may benefit from Teamwork or Leadership for teammates allowing them attack and defense bonuses.

Teamwork: a universal ability, Characters that share the same Team can add +1 to a either a Team member’s attack or defense for the remainder of the turn by tapping. A character may only benefit from teamwork from 1 character, once per turn.

Teams: a type of multiplayer format game where an even number of players act collaboratively against an equal number of opponents.

Tech: a common ability, this character may tap to repair one piece of equipment in play.

Technological Origin: energy linked to a character whose powers are tied to the advancement of technology.

Technopathy: a common and random ability, this character may tap to repair or disable one piece of equipment in play.

Text Box: a part on a card where you will find special abilities and their descriptions.

Thrown Object: a character power, strong characters can use their strength to hurl physical objects through the air at their opponents.

Timed activation cards: incident cards whose effects are applied during specified steps of the turn.

Total points: the first step of the Intermission phase during a campaign game where the amount of points required to win a game are tallied.

Transformative Origin: energy linked to a character whose powers are tied to science, chaos and chance; resulting in an altered human.

Trigger abilities: the second step of the Pre or Post combat Phase when active cards in play can trigger certain special abilities.

Triggered Abilities: an ability caused by a specific event in the game.

Unique: a universal ability, unless specified that a character is Non-Unique, there may only be one copy of any given character in play.

Universal Abilities: Universal abilities are those abilities that characters possess but are not written on their card. Each character may attack with base C, defend with base D, block, and engage in teamwork.

Un-tap: the first step of the beginning phase where a player will un-tap any cards that were tapped during the previous turn.

Untapped: the normal straightened out state of a card in play that is ready to perform an action.

Upkeep: the second step of the beginning phase where a player will fulfill any requirements for cards with a reoccurring cost and all events indicated to happen “before combat” occur.

Vampirism: a common and random ability, If this character injures another character in close combat they recover one wound.

Villain: a common ability, this character is able to kill another character.

Vulnerable: (X) a common ability, this character has a weakness against (X) type of attack, defense is reduced by D3 against this kind of attack.

Weapon: an item whose ability allows a character an augmented or altered attack.

Wound: the result of a successful attack against a character.

 

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10 thoughts on “The Epic Rulebook Version 2.0

  1. a few more alterations to the glossary I made all abilities clear as to if they are random, common or both. and a changed Mimic because i realized that even after making it copy abilities in play… magic can be an ability in play, and if you mimic magic the world ends so:

    Mimic: a common and random ability, this character has the ability to mimic common abilities of other characters in play once per turn with the exception of Immune, Invulnerable and Resurrect, which can only be mimicked once per game; and Magic, which cannot be mimicked.

    • Can you cite to me an incident where someone mimicked resurrection in a comic? I’m thinking along the lines of Rogue who absorbs someone’s powers, it’s mimic-like but notactual mimicing. Who actually mimics? And to what extent? My whole point is that I think mimic has access to certain abilities that it shouldn’t.

      • While I don’t have a specific example. If there was a character with the ability to return from the dead and rogue absorbed his abilities and was then killed she would ideally return from the dead.

        There is a marvel character called Mimic who has an idealized version of this ability.

        What I had in mind was a mutant version of magic or Peter from the TV show “heroes”.

        Thinking about it though We can easily remove resurrect because I don’t see it being used. You would have to mimic/magic the ability the turn before you are killed.

  2. I updated the random ability list so it will now be rolled on 6d6 to get a score between 6 and 36 rather than 5 and 30.
    finally, the random ability generator, power generator/lists and a list of the Universal, Common and Random abilities has been compiled into an easy reference guide linked to the top of the page.

    everything should be updated now.

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